Good Browser Titles

A lot of people underestimate how effective a well written browser title is, in terms of SEO.

Seriously, do not underestimate this simple rule. A good browser title can be a significant boost in search engine rankings (especially Google and Yahoo).

So how to write a good browser title?

Well firstly capitalize the first letter of every word except prepositions (of, and etc).

I'm not sure if this benefits SEO in anyway but it's correct grammar wise so will make your site more look slowly more professional to grammar geeks. Perception and conjecture based on image, layout, usability is key to the influence of a good site.

Anyways, the most important thing is keywords, obviously. But you do not want to just ram pack the title with keywords in a spam fashion. Type the title naturally, not too long, not too short, just presentable and readable, write it for humans!

You just have to make sure it describes the page well so that the keywords in the title will match the keywords on the page and if you can, the page header.

An example:

Say your page is about … health issues with smoking.

You've got something like:

"Info and Help with Smoking Health Issues | Lung Caner | Smoking Kills!"

It's good to sometimes include a question also as a lot of people type query's rather than just random keywords.

But remember, you need to make your title stand out in some way otherwise it will just get lumbered in with the rest, but do not go to the other extreme as ending up on the spam end of things! …

Is Amazon a Good Solution to Host Your WordPress Website?

After facing the fact that I need a faster hosting provider, I finally decided to try out some of Amazon's hosting products. Amazon has so many web services that it can be a little daunting to get started with them, but I decided to give it a go.

The first thing that I looked for was the ability to host WordPress websites. After a little research, I found that Amazon had just introduced a program for WordPress. Using their new "LightSail" product, I discovered that it was actually pretty straight forward to configure and load up WordPress. There are several other popular CMS apps as well, such as Drupal and Joomla. If you are interested in an e-Commerce solution, Magento is also supported.

Lightsail is not for large deployments, but it's pretty darn easy for smaller requirements. In a nutshell, you sign up, put in your domain name, set up WordPress, set up your DNS zones, map the static ip address that's assigned to you, and it launches.

When you go to launch one of the apps, Amazon refers to them as "instances". You would select the instance that you are interested in (WordPress, Drupal, etc) and follow the step-by-step directions.

1. The first thing is to name your instance. If you do not name it, Lightsail will create a name for you. Amazon works in zones, and in my case, it's usually Virginia. You can change the zone if you like, but I've found it's better just to leave it at the default zone.

2. You will also pick your instance plan, which is the monthly fee that suits your requirements.

3. You can also run other various scrips and choose either the default SSH key pair or change the key pair. As above, I always stick with the default.

4. Then click create. It takes a couple of minutes and then a page comes up with a public ip address and a username to connect to the instance. You will need your private key from your Amazon account, so if you do not have one, you'll need to create it.

5. Bitnami is used to connect to the new site. But after, you've loaded WordPress, you login exactly the same way with every other hosting company. Bitnami is pretty intuitive and does not take more than 15 or 20 minutes to learn how to navigate around.

There is also some project guides and videos as well to help with the install. According to the WordPress project guide there is only 5 steps, but in reality, it's more like 8 steps.

I loaded this up a few weeks ago, so I have not had time to fully build it out, but I had no problems loading the theme. I'm also using an AWS plugin (free) that will copy any media files to Amazon S3 and serve from S3 Cloudfront. Hopefully, this will cut down on load times for my pages.

It takes some getting used to not having cpanel, …