Google’s John Mueller Comments on SEO and Diversity

Google’s John Mueller at his session at PubCon Virtual 2020 offered his thoughts on where SEO is or should be going for the future, beginning with diversity in SEO hiring practices.

On Diversity in SEO

John Mueller’s first point was encouragement for more diversity. It didn’t really emphasize race but rather just diversity in general.

Here’s what Mueller said:

“I think the first one is something that’s really dear on my heart, is all about diversity in SEO. And this is something that from my point of view is something that you should be thinking about not just because it’s the right thing to do but also because it can really positively affect your business.”

Advertisement

Continue Reading Below

What wasn’t emphasized in his keynote was that diversity makes sense because hiring people on merit rather than because they “fit in” results in a better workforce.

This theme of

Read More

6 free online courses on diversity, equity, and inclusion to enroll in

  • Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) used to be an empty buzzword, until the killing of George Floyd and the coronavirus pandemic forced leaders to reckon with racial injustice in the US. 
  • Now, Americans want leaders to prioritize racial equity in the workplace. 
  • If you want to become a better manager, or set yourself up to become a leader within your company, it’s important to have an understanding of DEI. 
  • Here are six free online courses on DEI from places like the University of Virginia, and the University of Pittsburgh. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) have been buzzwords in business for years, with little results. That is, until the killing of George Floyd and a pandemic awoke leaders and the American public to massive racial injustice.

Now, more companies are hiring executives to lead the charge on DEI. Leaders are making huge financial commitments

Read More

How is STEM children’s programming prioritizing diversity? — ScienceDaily

Children’s television programming not only shapes opinions and preferences, its characters can have positive or negative impacts on childhood aspiration, says a new study from Michigan State University.

The study is the first large-scale analysis of characters featured in science, technology, engineering and math-related educational programming. It was published in the fall 2020 edition of Journal of Children and Media. Results revealed that of the characters appearing in STEM television programming for kids ages 3 to 6, Latinx and females are left behind.

“Children soak up subtleties and are learning and taking cues from everything; by age 5, you can see that they understand implicit biases,” said Fashina Aladé, lead author of the study and assistant professor in the College of Communication Arts and Sciences. “With the recent proliferation of STEM television over the past five years or so, I wanted to see who was showing kids how to solve

Read More

How is STEM children’s programming prioritizing diversity?

IMAGE

IMAGE:  “Children soak up subtleties and are learning and taking cues from everything; by age 5, you can see that they understand implicit biases, ” says Fashina Aladé, lead author of the…
view more 

Credit: Royalty-free from PxHere

EAST LANSING, Mich. – Children’s television programming not only shapes opinions and preferences, its characters can have positive or negative impacts on childhood aspiration, says a new study from Michigan State University.

The study is the first large-scale analysis of characters featured in science, technology, engineering and math-related educational programming. It was published in the fall 2020 edition of Journal of Children and Media. Results revealed that of the characters appearing in STEM television programming for kids ages 3 to 6, Latinx and females are left behind.

“Children soak up subtleties and are learning and taking cues from everything; by age 5, you can see that they understand implicit biases,” said Fashina

Read More