Scientists capture world’s first 3,200-megapixel photos

Scientists at the Menlo Park, California-based SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have taken the world’s first 3,200-megapixel digital photos, using an advanced imaging device that’s built to explore the universe.

“We will measure and catalog something like 20 billion galaxies.” said Steven Kahn, director of the Vera C. Rubin Observatory in Chile. That observatory is where the world’s largest digital camera will become the centerpiece of a monumental effort to map the night sky. The camera will spend 10 years capturing the most detailed images of the universe ever taken.  



a screen shot of a tiled wall: A head of romanesco broccoli captured at 3,200 megapixels. SLAC


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A head of romanesco broccoli captured at 3,200 megapixels. SLAC

“Most parts of the night sky have actually never been imaged at all by telescopes.” Kahn said. “No part of the sky has really been imaged with this kind of time, sequencing and time cadence, where you can watch how things change.”

The team working on the

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Computer Scientists Break the ‘Traveling Salesperson’ Record

When Nathan Klein started graduate school two years ago, his advisers proposed a modest plan: to work together on one of the most famous, long-standing problems in theoretical computer science.

Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent publication of the Simons Foundation whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research develop­ments and trends in mathe­matics and the physical and life sciences.

Even if they didn’t manage to solve it, they figured, Klein would learn a lot in the process. He went along with the idea. “I didn’t know to be intimidated,” he said. “I was just a first-year grad student—I don’t know what’s going on.”

Now, in a paper posted online in July, Klein and his advisers at the University of Washington, Anna Karlin and Shayan Oveis Gharan, have finally achieved a goal computer scientists have pursued for nearly half a

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Do Computer Scientists Use Math?

Recently a student, “James”, asked if it was possible to him to work in the computer field, even if he doesn’t like math and says he is not good at it.

The short answer: yes. The longer answer? Yes and no.

There is a huge opportunity for development of all kinds of software and hardware that doesn’t require mathematics, per se. Fields like software/app design and UX (user experience) quality assurance require understanding of the language involved and how the software interacts with the overall hardware, but not deep mathematics.

So James can certainly make a good career working with computers without knowing his epsilons and deltas.

But will math be useful?

Some areas – like some of the formulas we memorize in calculus class – will not be useful. But others, like discrete mathematics – will prove very useful to James: they will teach him concrete concepts he can … Read More

Learning R Programming Language Holds Critical Importance for Data Scientists

R is an open source programming language which has quickly gained huge popularity in the statistical software industry. With millions of statisticians and data scientists using this language all over the world, its popularity is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years. R can be considered as a statistical analytical package which includes all types of models, tests and analyses for manipulation and management of data. Those who wish to grow their career in the world of data science should definitely opt for R Programming Training.

Why R Programming Language is Hugely Popular among Data Scientists

R offers businesses with the most sophisticated and advanced business analysis tools that help them to utilize data in the most efficient manner. Discussed below are some of the reasons as to why it is preferred by data scientists:

Open Source

The best part about R is that, it is open source. This … Read More