Facebook’s New Cloud Gaming Service Streams Free-To-Play Mobile Games

Illustration for article titled Facebooks New Cloud Gaming Service Streams Free-To-Play Mobile Games

Image: Facebook Gaming

Google’s got Stadia, Amazon’s got Luna, and now Facebook has its own cloud gaming service. But don’t expect to stream console and PC hits on Facebook Gaming’s cloud. At launch, it’s all about free-to-play, microtransaction-packed mobile games.

Rolling out today in the U.S. in California, Texas, and the Northeast and mid-Atlantic states, Facebook Gaming’s cloud gaming offering isn’t so much a standalone service as it is an addition to the vast array of browser-based social games already available to play on the social media platform. Visitors to the Facebook Gaming landing page and Android app (no iOS support currently) in the beta testing areas will gain access to a selection of mobile games, including Asphalt 9: Legends, Mobile Legends: Adventure, PGA TOUR Golf Shootout, Solitaire: Arthur’s Tale, and WWE SuperCard. Rather than playing natively or launching their own apps, these games will stream to

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UPlay Plus subscription service rebrands as Ubisoft Plus, expands to Stadia and Luna

Ubisoft is overhauling its UPlay Plus subscription service with a new name — Ubisoft Plus — and launching integrations with both Google Stadia and Amazon’s new Luna service, all included in the same $14.99-per-month cost starting on November 10th.



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The PC side of UPlay Plus will stay largely the same as it’s been since Ubisoft launched the service last year. Subscribers will still get access to over 100 Ubisoft titles, including soon-to-be-released games like Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, Watch Dogs: Legion, and Immortals Fenyx Rising.

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But it’s the addition of Google Stadia (before the end of the year) and Amazon Luna (in November) that makes Ubisoft Plus interesting. Not only will you be able to access those games through your regular gaming PC, but you’ll be able to play them basically anywhere, thanks to Stadia and Luna’s game streaming technology.

It’s the fulfillment of a promise

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T-Mobile expands into live internet TV with new TVision streaming service





After years of anticipation, T-Mobile is finally getting into the live TV business with the launch of a new internet-based streaming service called TVision, launching on November 1st.

To be clear: TVision isn’t using the fiber-optic-based IPTV technology that it acquired alongside Layer3 back in 2017. It’s a traditional over-the-top streaming service that simply streams live television over the internet, just like YouTube TV, Hulu’s live TV service, Fubo TV, Sling TV, or (in perhaps the closest analogy) AT&T TV. But what sets TVision apart is its pricing, which aims to offer lower costs and more flexibility than its competitors.

Think of it as a T-Mobile’s take on YouTube TV or Sling


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To that end, TVision is broken up into a few different products. There’s the $40-per-month TVision Live, which offers the most traditional cable TV line. It’s focused largely on providing news and sports,

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T-Mobile offers up yet another TV streaming service

Yet another service provider is jumping into the TV streaming wars. This time it’s T-Mobile and its TVision service with live news, entertainment and sports channels, starting at $10 a month.

T-Mobile says it’s aiming to offer a simpler and and cheaper service for people dissatisfied with cable. But it’s entering a crowded field. And most similar streaming services have found it difficult to sustain low prices over time.

TVision will offer three branches of its service. TVision Live will have live news, entertainment and sports channels at three tiers priced at $40, $50 and $60, depending on how many sports channels you want. The $40 option offers around 30 channels including ABC, NBC, Fox, CNN, Fox News, ESPN, and Fox Sports Networks.

Then there’s TVision Vibe, which is $10 a month and includes about 30 channels from AMC, Discovery and Viacom — but no sports. And TVision Channels,

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Starlink recruits beta testers for ‘Better Than Nothing’ satellite broadband service

Being among the first to test Starlink, SpaceX’s much anticipated new satellite broadband service, will require a bit of an upfront investment.



a view of a snow covered slope: A stack of SpaceX Starlink satellites being deployed in orbit. SpaceX


© Provided by CNET
A stack of SpaceX Starlink satellites being deployed in orbit. SpaceX

According to emails shared with CNET and also posted online, the company is offering a “Better Than Nothing” beta test to select people who have registered their interest via the Starlink website. 

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“As you can tell from the title, we are trying to lower your expectations 😃,” the email reads.

According to the email, to get in the door requires $499 up front for the cost of a router and phased array antenna to connect to the service. After that, the monthly subscription cost is $99. 

The email also explains that actual results may vary, with data speeds from 50 Mb/s to 150 Mb/s and latency from 20 milliseconds to

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SpaceX launches public beta test of Starlink internet service

Oct. 27 (UPI) — SpaceX has launched public beta testing of its Starlink communications satellite program that aims deliver high-speed internet globally, particularly in underserved areas.

The Elon Musk-founded aerospace manufacturer sent out emails to invite people who signed up on its Starlink website to hear updates about the program.

The initial Starlink service is called “Better Than Nothing Beta,” according to multiple screenshots of an email, CNBC reported.

Joining the public beta test costs $99 a month on top of a $499 upfront cost for the ground equipment, which includes a user terminal to connect to the satellites, a mounting tripod and a Wi-Fi router.

SpaceX also has a Starlink app listed on the Google Play and Apple iOS app stores, which helps users set up their systems and allows them to search areas of the sky for unobstructed views.

“As you can tell from the title, we are

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T-Mobile revamps TVision service with live sports and news for $40/month, unveils $50 HUB device

The new TVision service will launch starting on Nov. 1, available on existing TV and mobile devices in addition to the new TVision HUB Android TV device, at right. (T-Mobile Photos)

T-Mobile unveiled an overhauled version of its TVision television service on Tuesday morning, along with a new TV streaming device, launching a new challenge to the cable industry and jumping into a crowded and competitive field of video platforms.

The revamped TV service is one of the first big competitive moves by the Bellevue, Wash., based wireless carrier following the completion of its $26.5 billion merger with Sprint earlier this year. It’s part of T-Mobile’s broader push beyond traditional wireless services, which also includes a move into 5G home Internet service.

Packages include a collection of live news and sports channels for $40/month, including ESPN, Fox, Disney and others, with additional content at higher tiers, up to $60/month total.

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SpaceX prices Starlink satellite internet service at $99 per month, according to e-mail

  • SpaceX is expanding the beta test of its Starlink satellite internet service, reaching out via email on Monday to people who expressed interest in signing up for the service.
  • Called the “Better Than Nothing Beta” test, according to multiple screenshots of the email seen by CNBC, initial Starlink service is priced at $99 a month – plus a $499 upfront cost to order the Starlink Kit.
  • That kit includes a user terminal to connect to the satellites, a mounting tripod and a wifi router



a bird flying in the sky: A Starlink user terminal attached to the roof of a building.


© Provided by CNBC
A Starlink user terminal attached to the roof of a building.

SpaceX is expanding the beta test of its Starlink satellite internet service, reaching out via email on Monday to people who expressed interest in signing up for the service.

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Called the “Better Than Nothing Beta” test, according to multiple screenshots of the email seen by CNBC, initial Starlink service

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Starlink starts $99 per month ‘Better than Nothing’ internet service beta

SpaceX is expanding its Starlink satellite internet beta to interested parties, requiring a $499 upfront purchase on top of a $99 per month fee.

SpaceX, one of the several projects from Tesla CEO Elon Musk, has sent out emails to those who expressed interest in signing up for the Starlink internet service.

The service will cost $99 per month but requires a user to purchase a $499 Starlink Kit. The kit includes a user terminal, a mounting tripod, and a WiFi Router. An iOS app for the service has recently appeared on the App Store.

The company has told customers to temper their expectations, according to an email seen by CNBC. The company itself calls it the “better than nothing beta” and warns that data speeds will likely vary between 50-150Mbps, with latency of between 20ms to 40ms — as well as “brief” periods of no connectivity at

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Facebook Is Rolling Out A Free Cloud Gaming Service Focused On Smaller Titles

KEY POINTS

  • Facebook’s cloud game service will focus on free-to-play and latency-tolerant games for now
  • The service will only be accessible via the web and the Facebook app on Android
  • The games on the new service include “WWE SuperCard” and “Mobile Legends: Adventure”

Facebook is offering a cloud gaming service like Google and Amazon but will focus on smaller, free-to-play games for now.

The tech giant’s service launched Monday as a beta on Facebook Instant Games and on its mobile app.

The first set of games Facebook has included in its cloud service are “Asphalt 9: Legends,” “PGA Tour Golf Shootout,” “Solitaire: Arthur’s Tale,” “WWE SuperCard” and “Mobile Legends: Adventure.” Set to join them in the coming weeks is “Dirt Bike Unchained” from developer Red Bull.

Facebook’s new service is different from the already established Facebook Gaming, which has been trying to compete with Twitch and YouTube Gaming. The tech

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