ComEd STEM Home Labs Provides Virtual STEM Programming for 100 Students During COVID-19 Pandemic

CHICAGO, Oct. 23, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — To safely bring STEM education to students during the COVID-19 pandemic, ComEd is launching ComEd STEM Home Labs, its first-ever virtual program to provide Chicagoland students with STEM engagement at home. ComEd engineers developed the program in collaboration with university professor and STEM influencer Dr. Kate Biberdorf. The series kicks off on Saturday, Oct. 24, for 100 students, ages 13-17, from across Chicago-area communities.

Continuing ComEd’s longstanding investment in STEM engagement for Chicago-area youth, this new program inspires students to advance their confidence, knowledge and career paths in STEM through hands-on experiments in a year where many extracurricular programs are on hold. By exciting young women and students of color about careers in science, technology, engineering and math, ComEd STEM Home Labs will encourage them to pursue jobs in STEM.

“Women, African Americans and Latinos remain underrepresented in STEM

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Pell Elementary receives $500K grant to bolster STEM programming



a group of people in a school bus in a parking lot: Students at Pell Elementry School in Newport will benefit from a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity. [PETER SILVIA PHOTO]


© Provided by The Newport Daily News
Students at Pell Elementry School in Newport will benefit from a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity. [PETER SILVIA PHOTO]

NEWPORT — Pell Elementary School in Newport has received a $500,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) to bolster is STEM programming, the School Department announced in an email Monday morning.

DoDEA leaders from the Committee on STEM Education of the National Science and Technology Council say “it is critical to our national security that our students spark interest in critical and fast-growing careers in STEM, and our PreK-12 education system is poised to increase and sustain student engagement in STEM. This grant will provide elementary students with the college and career-ready resources necessary to successfully build and/or expand its STEM programming.”

“Combined with current programs, the DoDEA grant will provide our youngest students with

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How is STEM children’s programming prioritizing diversity? — ScienceDaily

Children’s television programming not only shapes opinions and preferences, its characters can have positive or negative impacts on childhood aspiration, says a new study from Michigan State University.

The study is the first large-scale analysis of characters featured in science, technology, engineering and math-related educational programming. It was published in the fall 2020 edition of Journal of Children and Media. Results revealed that of the characters appearing in STEM television programming for kids ages 3 to 6, Latinx and females are left behind.

“Children soak up subtleties and are learning and taking cues from everything; by age 5, you can see that they understand implicit biases,” said Fashina Aladé, lead author of the study and assistant professor in the College of Communication Arts and Sciences. “With the recent proliferation of STEM television over the past five years or so, I wanted to see who was showing kids how to solve

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How is STEM children’s programming prioritizing diversity?

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IMAGE:  “Children soak up subtleties and are learning and taking cues from everything; by age 5, you can see that they understand implicit biases, ” says Fashina Aladé, lead author of the…
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Credit: Royalty-free from PxHere

EAST LANSING, Mich. – Children’s television programming not only shapes opinions and preferences, its characters can have positive or negative impacts on childhood aspiration, says a new study from Michigan State University.

The study is the first large-scale analysis of characters featured in science, technology, engineering and math-related educational programming. It was published in the fall 2020 edition of Journal of Children and Media. Results revealed that of the characters appearing in STEM television programming for kids ages 3 to 6, Latinx and females are left behind.

“Children soak up subtleties and are learning and taking cues from everything; by age 5, you can see that they understand implicit biases,” said Fashina

Read More