Top 5 Tips for Your First Gaming PC

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Building a gaming PC could and will be a great experience: from getting the actual parts to getting the fanciest case, everyone wants the best for his beast. These are some tips that will help the newbie to better understand the complex mindset behind the “Pc Master Race”. Let’s break them down in more detail.

Don’t Budget On The Power Supply

You probably already heard this way too many times, but it’s also way too important: budgeting on your power supply will not only be a bad decision, but it could literally destroy your whole system. Many are, in fact, the cases where full 4k ready machines almost exploded due to the fact that they used a D- class imported Chinese power supply. Pay attention to that!

Decide Your Gaming Goals Before Buying

Buying a gaming PC must be a planned and thoughtful decision. First of all, it’s important to clarify to yourself what your goals (and games you want to play) are: for example, it’s pointless to get an ultra-overclocked CPU if you are just planning on playing Minecraft offline. Every configuration should be prepared according to the results you want to achieve.

A Gaming PC For Gaming

When building a gaming PC, it’s important to understand the fact that, if you want to use it for other purposes, it will impact the actual machine’s memory, in particular, if you are planning to use it for graphic design/rendering and such.

Many app developers recently admitted that having a gaming-ready setup (referring, in particular, to the graphics computing power) is not required most of the times, so think about your goals (once again) when you buy its parts! This applies, most of the times, also to mobile app development related professionals.

AMD vs Intel

There you go, the big question. When it comes to processors, Intel and AMD are compared most of the times, since they are literally the only two brands everyone is using. In my personal point of view, AMD processors are a nice fit for entry-level based configurations, while Intel working best in higher specs ones. With AMD’s Ryzen series, this changed a bit, given the fact that these new units are incredibly fast and performing, but I still prefer Intel, overall.

Prices

Let’s break down some prices: currently, if you want to build an entry-level gaming machine you should expect to spend something around 400/500$, while still being able to play almost every game in high detail, these configurations are usually using old generation parts. The mid-level ones are currently fluctuating around 800$, with a potential 2K computing power. The best ones can go from 1200$ to more than 4000$, just think about them if you want to play everything in full 4K with a minimum of 80 FPS.