British backpacker, 28, ditches his law degree and turns a $100 website into skin care business

A British backpacker ditched his law degree and turned $100 into a skincare company worth $27million after having an epiphany about his future.

Henry Weaver, who had recently graduated from law school in the UK, was making his way around India when he had the revelation he didn’t want to settle for a nine-to-five office job.

The 28-year-old had planned to undergo a graduate program but awoke in sweats in the middle of the night, realising he had made the wrong decision. 

Mr Weaver ended up spending 18 months travelling around the world before eventually settling in Sydney where he took up a number of odd jobs in retail and recruitment.

Henry Weaver, who had recently graduated from law school in the UK, realised he didn’t want to settle for a nine-to-five office job, and launched men’s skincare line The Daily

Mr Weaver was making his way around India when he decided to ditch his law degree to become his own boss

Mr Weaver was making his way around India when he decided to ditch his law degree to become his own boss

After reading an article about skincare giant Glossier raising $52million from investors, he wondered how the brand could have made so much money.

At the same time Mr Weaver noticed there were no men’s skincare products on the market in a middle price range.

‘I thought, why is there nothing for men that isn’t supermarket products or the cost of your arm and leg for a bottle with the promise of a six-pack on it,’ he said. 

He couldn’t figure out why women were being offered good quality skincare at a lower price point, when men were looking for something just as fuss-free to keep their faces clean.

Mr Weaver launched The Daily after making a Shopify website for about $100, contacting graphic designers for the logo and packaging and taking demo shots. 

‘We had our very first order on May 4, 2019,’ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘My theory was that we had to make sure that people actually wanted this before we over invested in product development and packaging a brand. 

Just two months later, in July 2019, US retail giant HomeGoods approached Mr Weaver about selling his products at 300 of its stores across America

Just two months later, in July 2019, US retail giant HomeGoods approached Mr Weaver about selling his products at 300 of its stores across America 

Mr Weaver launched The Daily after making a Shopify website for about $100, contacting graphic designers for the logo and packaging and taking demo shots

Mr Weaver launched The Daily after making a Shopify website for about $100, contacting graphic designers for the logo and packaging and taking demo shots 

‘So we kept everything as cheap as possible, using services like Fiverr for freelancers and by May 4 we had our first sale and had only spent $100.’

Just two months later, in July 2019, US retail giant HomeGoods approached Mr Weaver about selling his products at 300 of its stores across America.   

The following month The Daily delivered its first store order to the US, before going on to sell to customers across Europe, Asia, New Zealand and South America. 

Mr Weaver urged other budding entrepreneurs to ‘just go for it,’ saying there’s ‘never been a better time’.

‘Ten years ago it wasn’t so easy to put together an e-commerce business. But now, Shopify is like $30 a month. It’s really easy to put up a site and it’s easy to scale,’ he said.

‘With the pandemic, it’s a level playing field moving forward. There are opportunities left, right and centre coming up.’

Mr Weaver advised other young people not to wait if they have a business idea in case someone else snags it.

He also said it’s wise to check whether their product idea is something consumers would be interested in buying.

The British expat spent less than $5000 to set up The Daily, which included buying stock and setting up the e-commerce website. 

in August 2019 The Daily delivered its first store order to the US, before going on to sell to customers across Europe, Asia, New Zealand and South America

Despite some men still believing a bar of soap is enough to clean their face, Mr Weaver believes that 'skin is skin'

The website sells a $30 Clean Face Cleanser, a larger 100mL cleanser called Bigger, Cleaner Face for $40, $30 Skin Repair Moisturiser, $30 Fresh Eyes Eye Cream with cucumber oil and the $35 Mud Face Scrub and Mask 

The website sells a $30 Clean Face Cleanser, a larger 100mL cleanser called Bigger, Cleaner Face for $40, $30 Skin Repair Moisturiser, $30 Fresh Eyes Eye Cream with cucumber oil and the $35 Mud Face Scrub and Mask. 

Despite some men still believing a bar of soap is enough to clean their face, Mr Weaver believes that ‘skin is skin’ and no matter what gender or race you are, it should be nourished. 

‘By taking care of your skin by washing away the days dirt, sweat, dead skin cells and rehydrating it, it will mean you will have clearer and healthy looking skin that feels better to touch, reducing problem areas like pimples or oily skin,’ he said.

‘It’s like your favourite t-shirt that you wear every day. If you don’t take care of it and wash it, it will get torn or look old and haggard pretty quickly.’

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