Northern California county to pay $10 million after shooting, paralyzing Silicon Valley software engineer

By OLGA R. RODRIGUEZ | The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO  — A Northern California county has agreed to pay nearly $10 million to settle a lawsuit by a Silicon Valley software engineer who was having a mental health crisis when a deputy shot him, paralyzing him from the waist down.

Placer County agreed to pay Samuel Kolb, 50, and his family $9.9 million to settle a lawsuit the family filed after a deputy shot him twice on Jan. 14, 2018, inside a North Lake Tahoe rental cabin where Kolb and his teenage son were vacationing, Kolb said.

“There’s a measure of relief in not having to go through this and not having to put my family through any more legal challenges. But I would trade all the money plus interest to have my old life back, to not have gone through this and put my family through this, to have

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Advanced computer model locks in picks for Stanford vs. California, Week 13 2020

A Pac-12 battle is on tap Friday between the California Golden Bears and the Stanford Cardinal at 4:30 p.m. ET on Friday at California Memorial Stadium. California is 0-2 and is playing their first home matchup, while Stanford is 0-2 and 0-1 on the road. The Golden Bears are favored by 1.5 points in the latest California vs. Stanford odds from William Hill, and the Over-Under is set at 52. Before you make any Stanford vs. California picks, you’ll want to see the college football predictions from the SportsLine Projection Model.

The SportsLine Projection Model simulates every FBS college football game 10,000 times. Over the past four-plus years, the proprietary computer model has generated a stunning profit of over $3,600 for $100 players on its top-rated college football picks against the spread. It is also a sizzling 44-23 on all top-rated picks through 12 weeks of the 2020 college football

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Computer game inspires development of disaster management app for California firefighters

California has beat its own record. In 2018, the Butte County “Camp Fire” took first place on the Top 10 list of the state’s deadliest and most destructive fires since 1932. Second place held firm with LA’s Griffith Park Fire of 1933. Yet, California wildfires ignited this year have taken first, third, fourth, and fifth places, with Northern California’s August Complex Fire at the top, having surpassed a million acres, says Will Pigeon, assistant fire captain for Contra Costa County Fire Protection District.

“I’m hearing the truth of what former Vice President Al Gore said in ‘An Inconvenient Truth,’ his 2006 documentary about global warming,” Pigeon said. “He was right when he correlated global warming with the dramatic and steady increase in wildfires.”

And, it’s only gotten worse.

“Times have changed,” said Pigeon, “and these megafires, extraordinary fires that devastate a large area, are the new normal. While it’s devastating

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First 5 California Launches Redesigned Flagship Website

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Nov. 18, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — First 5 California announced today the launch of its new Parent Website, First5California.com. The site, which is available in English and Spanish, is the result of over a year’s re-envisioning and development. Content for the site was informed by educators and researchers in the field of child development. It was redesigned from the bottom up to provide new levels of functionality, ease of use, and access to resources, tips, and activities.

“We are thrilled to be able to provide this updated and refreshed resource to California families,” said First 5 California Executive Director Camille Maben. “Our mission is to provide support and resources for parents so that all children in California can grow up healthy and ready to succeed in life. This is another important moment in that effort.”

Parents and caregivers visiting First5California.com will now be able to browse

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CALIFORNIA APPROVES BALLOT MEASURE EXPANDING CONSUMER DATA PRIVACY EXPECTED TO ROLLOUT NATIONALLY

Data443 is Well Positioned to Benefit from
Continued Increasing Cybersecurity Burden Imposed on Businesses

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC, Nov. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Data443 Risk Mitigation, Inc. (‘Data443’ or the ‘Company’) (OTCPK: ATDS), a leading data security and privacy software company, provided an update on the California Privacy Rights and Enforcement Act (‘CPRA’), approved by California voters on November 3rd, 2020. The CPRA is a new California state law that expands consumer data privacy, obligating businesses to provide consumers with the ability to opt-out of the collection of sensitive personal information collected, and further requires businesses to refrain from sharing the personal information of users, if requested. The CPRA expands, amends, and increases the protections afforded by the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which was adopted January 1, 2020, with enforcement actions initiated in July 2020.

Jason Remillard, CEO of Data443, provided the following insights and commentary, “The CPRA

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Uber’s Massive Win Over California Is a Win For the Gig Economy. That’s More Important Now Than Ever

Last year, California passed a very bad law, known as Assembly Bill 5. To be fair, you can make an argument it had a noble purpose, which was to provide workers in the so-called “gig economy” with protections they don’t receive as independent contractors. In reality, though, it was a blunt hammer that broke far more than it fixed.

California’s law redefined the test for whether a worker is classified as an employee. That’s important because companies like Uber have built their entire business on the idea that they use independent contractors who provide services to customers on their platform. 

On Tuesday, Californians passed Proposition 22, which amends that law to exclude “app-based drivers.” The ballot initiative was funded by $200 million from Uber and its ride-sharing competitor Lyft, which isn’t a surprise since AB 5 posed an existential threat to their companies. Voters overwhelmingly supported the proposition, passing it

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California voters approve expansion of data privacy law

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FILE – This Oct. 2, 2020 file photo shows an iPhone screen with Suunto’s cookie policy in Los Angeles. California voters have approved a measure to expand a digital privacy law that was passed two years ago. Proposition 24 includes provisions to triple the fines for companies that violate kids’ privacy and will create a dedicated state agency to enforce the law that was passed in 2018.

AP

In the state that is home to Silicon Valley and serves as the headquarters for Google, Facebook and other tech titans, voters strengthened data privacy protections by approving a ballot measure that supporters tout as a model for other states.

California became the first state to pass a sweeping digital privacy law in 2018, viewed as the strongest of its kind in the United States. It gave Californians the right to know what information companies collect about them

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Proposition 24 passes in California, pushing privacy rights to the forefront again

California voters approved on Tuesday a ballot measure designed to beef up consumer privacy protections, according to unofficial returns published by the state’s secretary of state. Proponents of the measure, known as Proposition 24, say the initiative would close a loophole in the state’s current privacy law that lets major tech companies continue to target ads with user data, even when users opt out. 



California voters approved a ballot measure Tuesday that proponents say will close a loophole in privacy laws and give consumers greater control over targeted advertising. Getty Images


© Provided by CNET
California voters approved a ballot measure Tuesday that proponents say will close a loophole in privacy laws and give consumers greater control over targeted advertising. Getty Images

The proposition is the brainchild of Alastair Mactaggart and Californians for Consumer Privacy, his advocacy group.

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“We are at the beginning of a journey that will profoundly shape the fabric of our society by redefining who is in control of our most personal information and putting consumers back in charge of their own

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California poised to establish a new data privacy regulator with Prop 24 win

California’s already tough privacy law is about to get a lot stronger as voters are expected to approve a ballot initiative expanding much of what the law covers this week. If approved, Proposition 24 would expand California’s privacy law to cover more sensitive data sets and establish a new state agency in charge of enforcing these rules for consumers. The result will be a higher standard for privacy in California and a powerful new state agency to take on tech companies.

As of press time, Proposition 24 is leading with 56 percent of the vote, as reported by The Sacramento Bee. Only about 65 percent of the vote has been tallied, but poll watchers expect the measure to clear based on the early returns.

The lead is strong enough that proponents of

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Uber, Lyft Shares Surge As California Passes Ballot Initiative on Driver and Delivery Worker Independence



a close up of a car: Uber, Lyft Shares Surge As California Passes Ballot Initiative on Driver and Delivery Worker Independence


© TheStreet
Uber, Lyft Shares Surge As California Passes Ballot Initiative on Driver and Delivery Worker Independence

Uber Technologies shares surged higher Wednesday, as did its ride-sharing rival Lyft Inc. , as early indications from a ballot initiative in California suggest the two companies can continue to treat their drivers as independent contractors.

California voters look to have passed Proposition 22, the most expensive ballot initiative in the state’s history, by a 58% to 42% margin Wednesday, enabling Uber, Lyft and other so-called ‘gig economy’ companies to allow drivers and delivery workers to set their own hours. Passing Proposition 22 will override a 2019 law that classified the drivers as employees of the San Francisco companies.

The win also relieves the burden of offering healthcare, unemployment insurance and minimum wage salaries from gig economy companies, who had argued such cost would lead to job cuts and price increases.

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