YC-backed BuildBuddy raises $3.15M to help developers build software more quickly

BuildBuddy, whose software helps developers compile and test code quickly using a blend of open-source technology and proprietary tools, announced a funding round today worth $3.15 million. 

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The company was part of the Winter 2020 Y Combinator batch, which saw its traditional demo day in March turned into an all-virtual affair. The startups from the cohort then had to raise capitalas the public markets crashed around them and fear overtook the startup investing world.

BuildBuddy’s funding round makes it clear that choppy market conditions and a move away from in-person demos did not fully dampen investor interest in YC’s March batch of startups, though it’s far too soon to tell if the group will perform as well as others, given how long it takes for startup winners to mature into exits.

Let’s talk code

BuildBuddy has foundations in how Google builds software. To get under

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Quantum computing: Aliro wants to make quantum hardware more accessible for software developers and network engineers

With Q.COMPUTE and Q.NETWORK, Aliro Quantum is using cloud tech to make it easy for software developers to run quantum programs and networking engineers to build quantum networks.

If you’re a developer who wants to write code for a quantum computer, how do you know which quantum architecture and by extension which company’s
quantum computer

is best suited for the problem you’re trying to solve? Likewise, if you’re interested in connecting quantum computers together across a quantum network, how do you pick the right hardware and network design?

Aliro Quantum, thinks the answer to both these questions is to use an abstraction layer.

On this episode of
Dynamic Developer

, I talk with Dr. Prineha Narang, Assistant Professor at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University and CTO and co-founder Aliro Quantum about how the company is trying to make quantum more accessible with

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Software developers face mounting pressure in 2021

The former Forrester Research Director Chris Mines predicted in 2019 that the world of software development was set for some big changes in 2020. We had no idea that a year later, almost every development shop would be a remote development shop. It makes the curated list of “remote-friendly” companies on GitHub a nostalgic reminder of a simpler, pre-pandemic time. Most developers adjusted well to the changes in 2020, certainly compared to other professions. Working hours increased and work weeks lengthened, but our digital world didn’t come crashing down like other sectors of the global economy. 

Now, however, the sprint is turning into a marathon, and as executives demand that developers pick up the pace of digital transformation, we are starting to see the stress fractures in mainstream software delivery grow. As remote development bleeds into mid-2021 and beyond, expect larger disruptions to the way development teams work, especially as

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Africa’s booming internet economy needs more software developers



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© Provided by Quartz


Africa is on course to add $180 billion or 5.2% of aggregate GDP by 2025 thanks to the rapid growth of its internet economy, says a report from the World Bank’s IFC and Google. In 2012, the continent’s internet economy (iGDP) was estimated at just $30 billion, or 1.1% of its GDP.

This year iGDP will contribute $115 billion, or 4.5% of a $2.554 trillion GDP, says Accenture. In the US the internet economy contributed around 9% of GDP in 2018.

Key to growing an internet economy—which includes everything from banks and fintechs to agritech, e-health, and venture capital—will be growing the developer talent that builds the products and engines on which it run. Last year, the French-born chief executive of Jumia, the pan-African e-commerce company, sparked outrage in African tech circles when he suggested there weren’t enough developers based in Africa to service his company’s

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What software developers should know about 2021: Low-code, AI code testing, COVID-19’s lasting effect and the skills needed to stay on top

Forrester made 5 predictions for software development in 2021. Bill Detwiler talks with software industry veteran VP and principal analyst Jeffrey Hammond, the report’s lead author, about what developers and IT leaders should expect in 2021.

Software development is in a state of change.
Low-code

and no-code platforms are shifting some of the dev process to non-programmers.
AI

is changing how we test the software we do write. And the COVID-19 pandemic has forced dev teams to rethink how they work, when everyone’s remote.

Forrester just released five 2021 predictions for software development and we had a chance to talk with Jeffrey Hammond, vice president and principal analyst serving application development leaders at Forrester and the lead author of that report, for TechRepublic’s
Dynamic Developer

podcast. Hammond is also a former developer and dev team manager, with over 25 years of experience in the software industry. The following is a

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Virtual Event Planning May Present New Opportunities for Software Developers


6 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


When’s the next time you’ll go to a concert, trade show or conference? For most of us, it is realistically looking like at least not until the end of next year, when we might get a vaccine and it can be widely manufactured and spread. While the shock of this pandemic moved many of us into working from home and Zoom meetings, those annual industry events that we’d all attend were completely forgotten, with many being canceled or postponed and others scrambling to create some kind of lackluster virtual event.

But the show must go on. Literally. We need to make virtual events doable, scalable and impactful and engaging.

Given that it might be more than a year until we can do these things in-person safely, we need solutions and we need them yesterday. As software

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Top 5 programming languages for web developers to learn

The following languages will help current and new web developers navigate the programming landscape to code web-based services and apps that are stable and secure.

developers

Image: istock/scyther5

Must-read developer content

In the last decade more and more applications have found their way to the cloud via web-based applications that work uniformly on almost any device running just about any operating system. Arguably, the days of using an OS for a specific application are largely behind us. Now, we can store data on the cloud, access it from the web app, modify it to our hearts’ content, and then save it, upload it, or share it with just a few taps or clicks.

SEE: Top 5 programming languages for systems admins to learn (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

At the center of this growth is, of course, the internet and the migration of many applications evolving into services running on remote, cloud-based hardware.

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Software Developers Face Mounting Pressure

Last year, (now retired) Forrester Research Director Chris Mines predicted that the world of software development was set for some big changes in 2020. We had no idea that a year later, almost every development shop would be a remote development shop. It makes the curated list of “remote-friendly” companies on GitHub a nostalgic reminder of a simpler, pre-pandemic time. Most developers adjusted well to the changes in 2020, certainly compared to other professions. Working hours increased and work weeks lengthened, but our digital world didn’t come crashing down like other sectors of the global economy.

Now, however, the sprint is turning into a marathon, and as executives demand that developers pick up the pace of digital transformation, we are starting to see the stress fractures in mainstream software delivery grow. As remote development bleeds into mid-2021 and beyond, expect larger disruptions to the way development teams work, especially as

Read More

What classic software developers need to know about quantum computing

IBM, Intel, Google, D-Wave and others have made significant advancements in the field of quantum computing
 over the past few years, but many hurdles (not all of them technical) exist before the technology can become a practical alternative for businesses. For example, software developers will need to learn new ways of writing programs for quantum computers.

In May this year, IBM hosted its fourth annual Quantum Challenge. The four-day event consisted of four exercises designed to help classic software developers, researchers, and even business users better understand how quantum programming works. Participants were able to use the 18 IBM Quantum systems on the IBM Cloud to complete the exercises, and according to IBM during the event the total use of these system “exceeded 1 billion circuits a day.” Over 1,745 people from 45 countries participated in the challenge and 574 people actually completed all four exercises.

In this instalment of 

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CD Projekt Red Developers Are Getting Death Threats After ‘Cyberpunk 2077’ Delay

Yesterday, developer CD Projekt Red once again delayed the hotly-anticipated Cyberpunk 2077 from its original November release date to December 10, 2020. It was the smallest of the multiple delays the game has seen so far, it’s caused an inflamed response from the internet nonetheless. According to Senior Game Designer Andrzej Zawadzki, already-overworked members of the team have begun receiving death threats.

Death threats and harassment of all stripes have been an endemic problem in the industry for years, triggered by all sorts of different parts of the development process. Zawadzki goes on to show some example of what he says are the milder messages developers have received. Having seen some of the more extreme examples of this sort of behavior elsewhere on the Internet, I can only guess at what some of the less mild examples look like.

It goes without saying that

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