Sony made the PlayStation 5 launch online-only, but that didn’t keep Target and Walmart from descending into internet chaos



graphical user interface, text, application: The checkout screen on Walmart's web store when it crashed on Thursday afternoon. Walmart


© Walmart
The checkout screen on Walmart’s web store when it crashed on Thursday afternoon. Walmart

After months of anticipation, Sony’s PlayStation 5 launched on Thursday. 

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Because of the pandemic, Sony decided not to go the traditional console launch route and isn’t selling the new game console in retail stores at launch. Instead of massive launch lines and stories of excited fans camping out overnight in front of GameStop, the main way to get a PS5 on November 12 is to have preordered the console months ago through one of several retailers.

Beyond that, PlayStation 5 buyers have one recourse on launch day: the digital storefronts of major retailers like Walmart, Target, and Best Buy. And at 12 p.m. ET on November 12, people got a look at how well that system worked.

The flood of customers at noon was so voluminous that it caused the entire Walmart

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Fact-check: Michigan software ‘glitch’ didn’t affect vote totals

Republicans claimed a ‘glitch’ on software used across Michigan gave Biden additional votes, but the state said it was human error that did not affect totals.

In Michigan, an error in the unofficial election results reported in one county led to allegations that votes were misallocated to Democratic candidate Joe Biden instead to President Trump.   

In a press conference on Nov. 6, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel echoed these claims. 

“There was a major software issue in Antrim County that we have concerns could have had problems in other counties as well,” she said. 

THE QUESTION

Did a “major software issue” cause the statewide election results to be affected in Michigan? 

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No, A “Glitch” in Michigan Election Software Didn’t Switch Trump Votes

Election workers count absentee ballots for the 2020 general election at TCF Center on November 4, 2020 in Detroit, Michigan.

Election workers count absentee ballots for the 2020 general election at TCF Center on November 4, 2020 in Detroit, Michigan.
Photo: Jeff Kowalsky (Getty Images)

Dispelling every bullshit election conspiracy that’s inundated the internet this week would be a full-time job in and of itself, but one particularly insidious theory has blown up to such a ridiculous degree that it deserves to be set straight.

Michigan GOP Chairwoman Laura Cox claimed at a press conference Friday that an election software “glitch” in one Michigan county switched thousands of votes for President Donald Trump to votes for Democratic challenger (now President-Elect) Joe Biden. Sounds like a pretty big scandal, right? Well, it very well might be if any portion of that statement was true. But though this conspiracy theory has been thoroughly debunked by Michigan election officials, that hasn’t stopped Trump supporters from sounding alarms about

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These 50 Swoon-Worthy Jobs Didn’t Exist 15 Years Ago



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

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33 Gadgets For Your Bedroom You Didn’t Realize You Need

A Baby Yoda night light? Check. Twinkle lights? Check, check.

We hope you love the products we recommend! All of them were independently selected by our editors. Just so you know, BuzzFeed may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page if you decide to shop from them. Oh, and FYI — prices are accurate and items in stock as of time of publication.

1.

A heatable dumpling plushie that’ll make you forget all about your sore muscles or stomach cramps so you can lay in bed in peace.


Urban Outfitters

Promising review: “Not only is it cute, but it is perfect size for my stomach. For cramps, this works wonders. It’s super soft and cuddly as well, so trying to get comfortable is not a problem. Best purchase.” —DeltaO3

Get it from Urban Outfitters for $29 (available in 10 styles).

2.

A mug

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iPhone 12 didn’t get USB-C, and now that MagSafe is here maybe it never will

I had high hopes that the iPhone 12 would move to a universal port that’s already everywhere. Instead, it’s traded one proprietary format for another. The iPhone 12 didn’t get USB-C at Apple’s event last week. (Here’s how to preorder and buy all four Apple 12 models.) Instead, it kept Lightning and added a new MagSafe connector



a hand holding a remote control: Come on already. Sarah Tew/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Come on already. Sarah Tew/CNET

I’ve been impressed by MagSafe on the iPhone 12 Pro so far. But I’m also starting to accept that USB-C on the iPhone will never happen. And the two shouldn’t be mutually exclusive.

Just forget about USB-C on an iPhone

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Lightning has been around since the iPhone 5 in 2012, when it debuted as a replacement for the old 30-pin charger that had been around since the iPod. Lightning had its advantages, way back last decade:

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A 4th grader walked to school to use its WiFi because he didn’t have internet at home :: WRAL.com

A 4th grader in Roswell, New Mexico, has been walking to his shuttered elementary school to do his classwork over the building’s WiFi because he didn’t have internet access at home.

Schools in the Roswell Independent School District have been conducting classes online because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Angel Endecott said her son Jonathon turns 10 next month and is a very independent child. They live near the school, and Jonathon walked to school and home last year, when school was in session.

Endecott, who works in home health, lost both of her jobs at one point because of COVID-19. She’s back at work at one of her jobs but wasn’t able to afford internet service.

She said her son was happy when she told him to go to the school to go online.

“He was like, ‘Yeah, I need to be back

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A fourth-grader walked to school to use its WiFi because he didn’t have internet at home

A fourth-grader in Roswell, New Mexico, has been walking to his shuttered elementary school to do his classwork over the building’s WiFi because he didn’t have internet access at home.



a person sitting in front of a brick building: Fourth-grader Jonathon Endecott does classwork outside his elementary school because he could get on the building's WiFi network.


© Provided to CNN
Fourth-grader Jonathon Endecott does classwork outside his elementary school because he could get on the building’s WiFi network.

Schools in the Roswell Independent School District have been conducting classes online because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Where schools are reopening in the US

Angel Endecott says her son Jonathon turns 10 next month and is a very independent child. They live near the school, and Jonathon walked to school and home last year, when school was in session.

Endecott, who works in home health, lost both of her jobs at one point because of Covid-19. She’s back at work at one of her jobs but wasn’t able to afford internet service.

She said her son was

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Google lawsuit a ‘huge deal’ even though Democrats didn’t join case, antitrust expert says

While a bipartisan group of lawmakers have criticized the market power of Big Tech, some might argue that the Justice Department’s new antitrust lawsuit against Google (GOOG, GOOGL) is politically motivated. Notably, the 11 attorneys general who joined the lawsuit were all Republicans, and the timing of the filing comes two weeks before the presidential election.

However, the Trump administration’s antitrust case filed against Google on Tuesday alleges even-handed claims, according to Matt Stoller, the research director for the non-profit American Economic Liberties Project, which advocates for robust antitrust regulation.

“It’s a solid complaint. It’s well argued. It’s good framing,” Stoller told Yahoo Finance’s The Final Round Tuesday, acknowledging that he is a Democrat. “It’s narrow, so it’s only handling how [Google] distribute[s] search, not the behavior they’re engaging in.”

The long-expected lawsuit filed Tuesday accuses Google of violating the Sherman Act, which prohibits actions that restrict marketplace competition. The

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