Quantum computing: Aliro wants to make quantum hardware more accessible for software developers and network engineers

With Q.COMPUTE and Q.NETWORK, Aliro Quantum is using cloud tech to make it easy for software developers to run quantum programs and networking engineers to build quantum networks.

If you’re a developer who wants to write code for a quantum computer, how do you know which quantum architecture and by extension which company’s
quantum computer

is best suited for the problem you’re trying to solve? Likewise, if you’re interested in connecting quantum computers together across a quantum network, how do you pick the right hardware and network design?

Aliro Quantum, thinks the answer to both these questions is to use an abstraction layer.

On this episode of
Dynamic Developer

, I talk with Dr. Prineha Narang, Assistant Professor at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University and CTO and co-founder Aliro Quantum about how the company is trying to make quantum more accessible with

Read More

Amazon: We’re hiring software engineers who know programming language Rust

Rust, the programming language hatched at Mozilla, has found a major fan in Amazon Web Services (AWS). 

AWS has announced its intention to hire more Rust developers in coming months as part of its plan to support the open-source community behind the young language, which has become popular for systems programming. 

Open-source Rust only reached version 1.0 five years ago. It was created with a prime goal of eradicating memory-related security bugs in Firefox’s Gecko rendering engine. Many of these security issues were because the engine was written in C++, which Mozilla described as having “an unsafe memory model”. 

Microsoft is also a big fan of Rust has been exploring its use in search of a way of reducing memory-related vulnerabilities in Windows components written in C and C++. But while Rust is well liked, not many developers are familiar with it, Stack Overflow found in its 2020 survey of

Read More

SpaceX Starlink engineers explain outages, hiring for ‘hot jobs’

  • Engineers working on SpaceX’s Starlink listed a number of “hot jobs” that SpaceX are looking to fill during a Q&A session with the Reddit’s Starlink community on Saturday.
  • SpaceX is hiring numerous roles in design and engineering, they said, and gave out an email for people to send resumes. 
  • They also promised improvements to Starlink, which is already giving users speeds of more than 160 Megabits per second. 
  • For example, they were working on reducing outages caused by obstructing branches or poles near Starlink terminals on the ground, they said.
  • The SpaceX engineers also said that reducing production costs — and therefore the cost of Starlink for users — was “going well but this is no doubt one of the hardest challenges we’re tackling.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Engineers at Elon Musk’s SpaceX laid out Saturday how they plan to improve the aerospace company’s Starlink satellite-internet service

Read More

How much Lyft pays employees, from software engineers to managers

  • Business Insider analyzed salary data Lyft shared with the US government.
  • Lyft’s compensation is competitive with, and in some cases exceeds, Uber’s.
  • The positions included in this report have salaries ranging from $135,000 to $305,000.
  • Are you a current or former Lyft employee? Do you have an opinion about what it’s like to work there? Contact this reporter at [email protected], on Signal at 646-768-4712, or via his encrypted email address [email protected]
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Though Lyft trails Uber in its stock price and US market share, the same does not appear to be true for employee compensation. According to salary data Lyft shared with the US government, its pay for some positions matches or exceeds what Uber offers.

The US Office of Foreign Labor Certification requires companies to disclose compensation for permanent and temporary employees from outside the US to ensure the firms aren’t paying them

Read More

River Oaks software engineer wins patent recognition awards from Society of Women Engineers

Nelia Mazula wasn’t proud of her patents at first — she didn’t understand the significance that they held.

Now, Mazula hangs her patents on her wall, proud of her accomplishments as an African American woman in the STEM field.

On HoustonChronicle.com: Memorial area senior living community celebrates Veteran’s Day with memorial wall

Mazula, who lives in River Oaks, is a Houston-based innovator, engineer and digital transformation strategist. This year, the Society of Women Engineers, the world’s largest advocate for women in engineering and technology, announced Mazula would be the recipient of five Patent Recognition Awards for her software patents that focused on augmented reality, big data visualization and artificial intelligence.

“I am honored to represent Houston and receive this award,” said Mazula. “I hope to serve as an example of how an African American woman is positively contributing to the wholesale digital transformation of an established industry like oil and

Read More

How much Uber pays employees, from software engineers to data analysts

  • Business Insider analyzed salary data Uber shared with the US government.
  • Companies have to tell the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification how much they pay employees from outside the US to make sure they’re not offering below the market average.
  • The positions included in this report have salaries ranging from $85,301 to $330,000.
  • Are you a current or former Uber employee? Do you have an opinion about what it’s like to work there? Contact this reporter at [email protected], on Signal at 646-768-4712, or via his encrypted email address [email protected]
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Though Uber has gone through multiple rounds of layoffs in the past two years, its pay for some positions is competitive with many of the biggest Silicon Valley tech firms, according to data the ride-hailing firm has shared with the US government.

The US Office of Foreign Labor Certification requires companies to disclose

Read More

EPFL engineers develop a computer chip with logic and data storage on a single architecture

Engineers at EPFL have made a breakthrough in electronics with the development of a computer chip combining logic operations and data storage into a single architecture. The breakthrough paves the way for more efficient computing devices in the future. The breakthrough came from the EPFL’s Laboratory of Nanoscale Electronics and Structures.

Engineers say the architecture could have major benefits for artificial intelligence systems. The tech is the first to use a 2D material for a logic-in-memory architecture. That architecture combines both logic and memory functions. The energy efficiency of computer chips is traditionally limited by the von Neumann architecture currently used with data processing and data storage in two separate units.

Having data processing and storage in separate units means data has to be transferred continuously between the two using up time and energy. Combining processing and storage into a single architecture allows a reduction of both time and energy

Read More

Rockset, founded by former Facebook engineers, raises $40 million

  • On Tuesday, the search and analytics startup Rockset announced a $40 million Series B. 
  • Rockset cofounder and CEO, Venkat Venkataramani, says the company saw a “lull” at the beginning of the pandemic just as it was building out its sales functions, but was able to adjust its marketing strategy. 
  • The former Facebook engineers who founded the company are leaning on their past experience scaling the social media giant’s data systems.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The search and analytics startup Rockset was in the midst of growing a new sales unit earlier this year when the pandemic struck. Customers were suddenly hesitant to make new purchasing decisions and the firm saw a “lull” in business from March until May, according to cofounder and CEO Venkat Venkataramani.

But as companies settled into remote work, Rockset’s software for real-time data processing began gaining traction. 

“If [the lull] lasted six months,

Read More

‘India can provide teachers to the world, just like software engineers,’ says Byju Raveendran as he plans to take his $11 billion edtech startup to US shores

  • BYJU’S is now looking to conquer bigger international markets, starting with the US.
  • Speaking on the sidelines of the Business Insider Global Trends Festival 2020, Byju Raveendran said that just like how India provides software engineers to the world, we can also provide teachers.
  • While White Hat Jr currently offers only coding, Byju added that they would soon add mathematics to its offerings.

The world’s most valued edtech startup, BYJU’S, is now aiming for global domination. After riding the wave of online learning in India during the coronavirus lockdown, BYJU’S is now looking to conquer bigger international markets, starting with the US.

“I strongly believe that having a strong primary market like India helps us create the right products and there is an opportunity to take this ahead and help students learn outside India,” said Byju Raveendran, founder of the $11 billion BYJU’S, on the sidelines of the Business Insider

Read More

India’s engineers have thrived in Silicon Valley. So has its caste system.

Whenever Benjamin Kaila, a database administrator who immigrated from India to the United States in 1999, applies for a job at a U.S. tech company, he prays that there are no other Indians during the in-person interview. That’s because Kaila is a Dalit, or member of the lowest-ranked castes within India’s system of social hierarchy, formerly referred to as “untouchables.”



A neighborhood in Cupertino, Calif.


© Sam Hall/Bloomberg News
A neighborhood in Cupertino, Calif.

Silicon Valley’s diversity issues are well documented: It’s still dominated by White and Asian men, and Black and Latino workers remain underrepresented. But for years, as debates about meritocracy raged on, the tech industry’s reliance on Indian engineers allowed another type of discrimination to fester. And Dalit engineers like Kaila say U.S. employers aren’t equipped to address it.

Loading...

Load Error

In more than 100 job interviews for contract work over the past 20 years, Kaila said he got only one job

Read More