Why does computer think the printer is offline when it isn’t?

Q: My wife’s HP laptop (purchased in 2013, running Windows 8.1) is having difficulty printing to our HP OfficeJet 4655 over Wi-Fi. She gets a “printer is offline” message (even though it isn’t), and nothing can clear it short of deleting the printer and reinstalling it. This clears it every time, but she doesn’t have the patience to do this every time to print a document. The problem recurs every time she restarts her computer. Our network router is a Netgear N600. Other communications through this router (such as internet) work fine. This problem used to occur only occasionally, but now it’s constant.

The printer and router are in the same room as my HP laptop (purchased in 2019, Windows 10). My computer has never had this problem. Her computer is in the kitchen, through a couple of walls.

How can I troubleshoot this and determine why her computer thinks

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Michigan election software isn’t good enough at detecting human error, expert says

Michigan’s election software systems should be better at catching human error, experts say after at least two cases of flawed early results reporting on Election Day.

Some Republican leaders point to the errors among several reasons they believe the 2020 election results lack integrity. Meanwhile, state officials assure the public there is nothing to worry about.

These mistakes were exceptions, the result of user error and fail-safes are in place that would have caught the inaccuracies before they were certified anyway, Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s office said.

“The erroneous reporting of unofficial results from Antrim county was a result of accidental error on the part of the Antrim County clerk,” Benson’s office said. “The equipment and software did not malfunction and all ballots were properly tabulated. However, the clerk accidentally did not update the software used to collect voting machine data and report unofficial results.”

Iowa University Professor

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Bloodborne Isn’t 60FPS On PS5, But Some Other FromSoftware Titles Are

Bloodborne is one of the PS4’s most important games for many players, and there’s been a lot of speculation on how it might be improved on PS5, as many titles will be. We can now confirm that–at launch, at least–the title does not receive a significant framerate improvement. However, some other titles made by developer FromSoftware are in better shape.

Lance McDonald, a modder whose work with From Software games is quite prolific (see, for instance, his restoration of cut Sekiro content) has been testing From Software’s games on PS5, and has found that Bloodborne is, sadly, still locked to 30fps. “Bloodborne is still 30fps with bad frame pacing,” he confirms.

On the other hand, Sekiro and Dark Souls III both have improved framerates. McDonald has confirmed in a tweet that both games run at 60fps on the next-generation Sony system. Both of these games were released by FromSoftware after

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No, There’s Isn’t a ‘Glitch’ in Michigan Election Software That Flipped Thousands of Trump Votes

Dispelling every bullshit election conspiracy that’s inundated the internet this week would be a full-time job in and of itself, but one particularly insidious theory has blown up to such a ridiculous degree that it deserves to be set straight.

Michigan GOP Chairwoman Laura Cox claimed at a press conference Friday that an election software “glitch” in one Michigan county switched thousands of votes for President Donald Trump to votes for Democratic challenger (now President-Elect) Joe Biden. Sounds like a pretty big scandal, right? Well, it very well might be if any portion of that statement was true. But though this conspiracy theory has been thoroughly debunked by Michigan election officials, that hasn’t stopped Trump supporters from sounding alarms about supposed voter fraud in many of the 28 states where the software’s manufacturer, Dominion Voting Systems, supplies election tech.

The theory, which has “no merit” according to a statement from

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A Tesla-Amazon competition developing, but Musk isn’t worried

  • Tesla has become the most valuable automaker in the world, with a nearly $400-billion market cap.
  • Amazon, according to a Wall Street analyst, could be aiming to take Tesla on by investing in electric-vehicle and self-driving startups that might someday compete with Elon Musk’s automaker.
  • Startups and established companies alike have studied Tesla’s struggles and are trying to devise less risky and expensive ways to reinvent mobility.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas tends to have some of the more interesting ideas about the future of transportation, and on a conference call with Tesla CEO Elon Musk after the carmaker reported a third-quarter profit, he was in good form.

“Amazon appears to be investing and building an autonomous or electric transport network of some ilk through some organic investments, but also … Aurora, Rivian, etc.,” Jonas said.

Then he asked Musk, “What advice would

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There’s No Election Clarity But The Stock Market Isn’t Panicking, Here’s What Investors Are Predicting

Topline

Though election results are still very much up in the air, technology stocks are surging on Wednesday as the growing prospects of a Republican-controlled Senate and a White House victory for former vice president Joe Biden squash fears of broad-based regulation that could have crippled tech giants like Facebook, Alphabet and Amazon.

Key Facts

The tech-heavy Nasdaq is leading market gains late Wednesday morning, climbing 4.5% while the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 gain 2.3% and 2.9%, respectively. 

Among the Nasdaq’s top performers on Wednesday are tech giants like Facebook, Alphabet and Amazon–stocks that have outperformed during the pandemic and are up 6% on Wednesday.

Those big tech stocks are being boosted by the prospects of a split Congress in Washington, which means sweeping regulation for the sector

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In China, Big Tech Isn’t the Enemy. It’s the Strategy

Just as the U.S. government starts looking to rein in, or even break up, big technology companies in the belief they have too much power, China is going in the opposite direction. We should expect to see more money, more policy favoritism, and more attention from party cadres aimed at ensuring the establishment of big successful chip and software firms.

The Fifth Plenum of the Chinese Communist Party’s 19th Central Committee wrapped up Thursday by tasking the nation to, among other things, develop self-reliance and build its technological power.The result will be a more insular approach to industry and trade as Beijing strengthens a robust domestic market for those up-and-coming heroes to ply their wares.

Foreign companies — notably in semiconductors, software or materials — that still believe China is a viable long-term business are kidding themselves. Only those supplying crucial products and services not available locally will have any

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iPhone sales fell 20% ahead of iPhone 12 launch, but Apple isn’t worried

Apple’s iPhone sales  plummeted 20% as consumers awaited the release of its iPhone 12  amid the continued spread of the coronavirus pandemic, which has upended lives, disrupted business and slowed manufacturing across the globe. But Apple executives said they weren’t terribly worried about it.



a hand holding a small camera: Now that the iPhone 12 is out, the next question is how well it'll do. Patrick Holland/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Now that the iPhone 12 is out, the next question is how well it’ll do. Patrick Holland/CNET

That’s primarily thanks to Apple’s delay releasing the iPhone 12, creating a fluke in financial reporting that artificially made the company’s sales look lower than they otherwise would. Last year’s number included about a week of newly announced iPhone sales. This year’s number did not. As a result, Apple tallied $26.4 billion in older iPhone  sales, down more than a fifth from the same time a year ago.



a close up of text on a black surface: Squint hard enough and you might see Apple's future.


© Angela Lang/CNET

Squint hard enough and you might see Apple’s future.


Instead of lingering on

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Kim Kardashian threw a party on a private island during a pandemic, and the internet isn’t letting it go

Undeterred by an ongoing pandemic, Kim Kardashian West has revealed she threw a party for herself and dozens of friends on a private island that swapped social distancing for dancing, bike-riding and swimming with whales. But at least she did it humbly.
The television personality is facing a backlash and torrent of memes after sharing pictures of her 40th birthday blowout at an undisclosed island — an experience which, she says, gave her a slice of normality in challenging times.

“After 2 weeks of multiple health screens and asking everyone to quarantine, I surprised my closest inner circle with a trip to a private island where we could pretend things were normal just for a brief moment in time,” Kardashian West wrote on Twitter.

“We danced, rode bikes, swam near whales, kayaked, watched a movie on the beach and so much more,” she explained, alongside pictures of guests at the

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SpaceX is on a stunning streak with Starlink, Elon Musk’s plan to bathe Earth in high-speed internet. But the scheme isn’t without big snags.



a sunset over a body of water: SpaceX founder Elon Musk has called Starlink user terminals, which are designed to connect to the internet via a fleet of orbiting satellites, "UFOs on a stick." Ashish Sharma/SpaceX


© Ashish Sharma/SpaceX
SpaceX founder Elon Musk has called Starlink user terminals, which are designed to connect to the internet via a fleet of orbiting satellites, “UFOs on a stick.” Ashish Sharma/SpaceX

  • SpaceX has rocketed nearly 900 Starlink satellites into orbit to build a high-speed internet service.
  • Elon Musk, the company’s founder, says Starlink will soon open for a public beta, followed by paid US service shortly thereafter.
  • Early results are promising, with high speeds and low latencies. SpaceX even gave Starlink terminals to Washington State emergency responders and the Hoh Tribe, which both lauded the technology.
  • Starlink also got FCC approval to bid for $20.4 billion in subsidies, is close to being licensed in Canada and Australia, and has won multiple US military contracts.
  • But Starlink faces significant challenges in terms of the network’s capacity, effects on astronomy, and creation of space debris. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more
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