Biden Team Hides Secret Job Advert in Source Code of Presidential Transition Website

President-elect Joe Biden’s team has hidden a job advert in the source code of its buildbackbetter.gov transition website, as it begins the process of attempting to staff its new administration.



Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: President-elect Joe Biden at the Queen Theatre on November 24, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.


© Mark Makela/Getty Images
President-elect Joe Biden at the Queen Theatre on November 24, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.

The secret advert was spotted by “The Jester,” an anonymous “hacktivist” who was listed by Time magazine as one of the most influential people on the internet in 2015.

“NICE!!! In the rendered source code of president-elect @joebiden’s https://buildbackbetter.gov website,” the Jester wrote in a Twitter post highlighting the section of code that contains the advert.

“This harkens back to the likes of the UK’s MI5 and MI6 who I believe used to recruit the type of people they were looking for by publishing obscure crossword and puzzle competitions in newspapers,” the hacktivist said.

Tech journalist Neal Ungerleider suggested in a

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Joe Biden launches presidential transition website

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Wednesday launched a transition website as he neared the 270 electoral votes needed to defeat President Trump.

The site, buildbackbetter.com, features only a homepage topped with an image of the former vice president. It says “Biden-Harris Transition” against a solid blue background.

“The American people will determine who will serve as the next President of the United States. Votes are still being counted in several states around the country,” an unsigned message on the site says.

“The crises facing the country are severe — from a pandemic to an economic recession, climate change to racial injustice — and the transition team will continue preparing at full speed so that the Biden‑Harris Administration can hit the ground running on Day One.”

Trump has not conceded defeat and Biden has not quite clinched victory as absentee ballots are counted in remaining swing states.

Trump’s campaign filed

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Representatives propose bill limiting Presidential internet ‘kill switch’

A pair of U.S. Representatives — one from each party — are proposing a law that would limit the President’s ability to shut down the internet at will. That may not strike you as an imminent threat, but federal police disappearing protestors into unmarked vans probably didn’t either, until a couple months ago. Let’s keep an open mind.

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The President has the power under the Communications Act’s Section 706 to order the shutdown of some communications infrastructure in an emergency. While this was likely intended more for making sure official phonecalls could get through in a national emergency, it’s possible that today it could be used as a measure to tamp down on protests and civil unrest, as we’ve seen in authoritarian regimes around the world.

The Preventing Unwarranted Communications Shutdowns Act, from Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-CA) and Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-VA), doesn’t remove this ability, but adds

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New Bill Strips Presidential Authority to Shut Down Internet

Two lawmakers, a Democrat and a Republican, have introduced a bill that would limit the President’s authority to shut down the internet. Congresswoman Anna G. Eshoo (D-CA) and Congressman Morgan Griffith (R-VA) announced the Preventing Unwarranted Communications Shutdown Act on Thursday.

The move comes just over a week before an election that many fear could be chaotic and contested.

Though it’s never happened in the United States, the President does have the power to shut down the internet according to 1934’s Communications Act. Section 706 of the act allows the President carte blanche to shutdown wireless communications “upon proclamation by the President that there exists war or a threat of war, or a state of public peril or disaster or other national emergency, or in order to preserve the neutrality of the United States.”

The Preventing Unwarranted Communications Shutdowns Act would amend Section 706 and put limits on the President’s

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New 2020 Presidential Election Website FactsAboutTrump.Com Launched

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 19, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — JMJ Media, LLC announces the launch of a new website (factsabouttrump.com) to provide insightful analysis, and commentary on the key issues of the 2020 presidential election and how President Trump’s policies compare to Mr. Biden.

Supported by thorough research and supporting links, the new website provides an in-depth look at each candidate’s plans on the following key issues:

  • Economy
  • COVID-19
  • Health Care
  • Education
  • Military
  • Gun Rights
  • Climate Change
  • Socialism

The website also includes a FAQ section addressing important questions that have been expressed by voters. The “Candidate Comparison” webpage provides a brief summary of each candidate’s backgrounds and an opinion as to the potential results for each of their platforms.

FactsAboutTrump.Com is not affiliated with any political party platform or political action committee, but strives to provide critical, timely facts, commentary and opinions to voters so they can make an

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How the Internet Viewed the Presidential Town Halls

To the delight of some and the consternation of others, Twitter went down briefly on Thursday evening in the United States and beyond.

But for better or worse, the social media platform was (mostly) back online in time for the evening’s dueling town hall events featuring President Trump and Joseph R. Biden Jr. — because where else can we try desperately to make a clever political joke before someone else does?

On Thursday, the internet felt compelled to weigh in on the stark difference in tone between the two forums, Savannah Guthrie’s performance moderating the discussion with Mr. Trump on NBC, and other assorted Easter eggs that surfaced during all of the questions and answers.

In case your Twitter account went dark on Thursday night — or if you blessedly didn’t have one to begin with — here’s a quick look at what the online world deemed important.

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