Roku Hires Apple’s Chief Siri Architect For Software Role

(Bloomberg) — Roku Inc. has hired a Siri executive at Apple Inc. to lead advanced technology development.



Roku streaming stick


© Photographer: Monica Schipper/Getty Images North America
Roku streaming stick

Brian Pinkerton has joined the San Jose, California-based maker of TV set-top-boxes and software where he will focus on “technical innovation and strategic software development across the platform,” the company said on Tuesday. His work will be broader than voice control, which was his specialty at Apple, where he was the chief architect of Siri until November, according to his LinkedIn page. Pinkerton was also previously chief technology officer for the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

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Roku sells several streaming video players to access video content as well as sound bars, but the company has increasingly focused on expanding its software platform and the Roku Channel streaming service. It has also been pushing for its software to be built into lower-end TVs, ceding

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Roku Hires Apple’s Former Chief Siri Architect for Software Role

(Bloomberg) — Roku Inc. has hired a senior manager for Siri at Apple Inc. to lead advanced technology development.



Roku streaming stick


© Photographer: Monica Schipper/Getty Images North America
Roku streaming stick

Brian Pinkerton has joined the Los Gatos, California-based maker of TV set-top-boxes and software where he will focus on “technical innovation and strategic software development across the platform,” the company said on Tuesday. His work will be broader than voice control, which was his specialty at Apple, where he was the chief architect of Siri until November, according to his LinkedIn page. Pinkerton was also previously chief technology officer for the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

Roku sells several streaming video players to access video content as well as sound bars, but the company has increasingly focused on expanding its software platform and the Roku Channel streaming service. It has also been pushing for its software to be built into lower-end TVs,

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What Stood Out in Earnings Calls from Roku, Expedia, PayPal and Others

Week 3 of earnings season brought with it some telling disclosures about online travel and video ad spend, 5G chip sales and e-commerce and payments activity, among other things.

Here’s a recap of some notable things that were shared over the last few days by reporting tech companies.

Roku and The Trade Desk

The 32% annual YouTube ad sales growth that Alphabet  (GOOG) reported on Oct. 29 already signaled that online video ad spend was (like many other kinds of online ad spend) on the upswing as brand ad budgets loosen up.

But Roku (ROKU) and The Trade Desk’s (TTD) results and commentary arguably did more than just that: They suggested there’s a major inflection in online video ad spend as dollars are grabbed from traditional TV ad budgets amid major TV ratings declines and accelerated cord-cutting.

Roku, which rose 12.6% post-earnings on Friday, reported that its monetized video ad

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Walmart, Comcast in Talks to Develop Smart TVs; Roku Slides

Comcast  (CMCSA) – Get Report is reportedly in talks with retail giant Walmart  (WMT) – Get Report to develop and distribute smart TVs, as the cable titan looks to become a dominant hub for streaming apps.

Under the terms the companies are discussing, Walmart would promote TV sets running Comcast software, and would get a share of recurring revenue from Comcast in return, people familiar with the matter told The Wall Street Journal.

Comcast’s talks with Walmart, the world’s largest retailer, are at an early stage and may not result in an agreement, the Journal said.

Shares of Comcast at last check were up 3.3% to $42.78, while Walmart was up 1.5% to $142.55. 

The Comcast software would help consumers navigate through their streaming apps and watch programming. 

The move would put Comcast up against tech companies that already are the major players in the streaming

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MoffettNathanson media/Internet look praises Fox; sees long-term upside for Netflix, Roku (NASDAQ:ROKU)

MoffettNathanson’s latest look at media/Internet names raises the specter of whether the sector is in a bubble – comparing current valuation approaches to those taken in the dot-com bubble-and-crash of 1999-2000.

But the firm sees some long-term value in premium names due to structural tailwinds; that includes names it’s Neutral on, like Roku (NASDAQ:ROKU), where it’s raised its price target to $170 from $145, and Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX), where it maintains a target of $390.

On the positive side, it still sees Fox (NASDAQ:FOXA) as a Buy due to fundamentals and an attractive valuation. It’s bumped that price target to $37 from $36 (implying 42% upside).

And on the downside, it thinks Omnicom (NYSE:OMC) has limited upside and rates it a Sell. Its price target of $45 implies 11.5% downside.

The firm reiterated its Neutral rating on ViacomCBS (NASDAQ:VIAC) but raised its price target to $27 from $25 (vs.

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Did you know: Roku was nearly a part of Netflix

Roku is a household name in the United States, making some of the best and most popular streaming devices on the market. But did you know that Roku was very nearly a part of Netflix?

In fact, it was Netflix engineers that developed the first Roku device. It was slated to launch in 2007, the same year that Netflix launched its now-ubiquitous video-on-demand service. But just a few weeks before this “Netflix Player” came to market, the strategy shifted and it was instead spun off into its own company.

Here’s the full story, but first a bit of context.

A bygone era

Netflix dramas on smartphone stock photo 4

It’s easy to forget in today’s streaming-centric society that things were very different back in 2007. Netflix’s main business was mail-in DVD rentals, and the entire concept of video streaming was in its infancy. Even early versions of Vimeo and YouTube were just starting to get off the

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