The FTC may sue Facebook over antitrust violations by late November

The FTC may have narrowed down the time frame for an antitrust lawsuit against Facebook. Politico sources claim the Commission is “likely” to sue Facebook before November is over. It might not be the quick, public legal battle some would hope for, though. Officials are reportedly leaning toward an “internal” case that would put the matter in front of an administrative law judge rather than letting states join in. That would increase the chances of a successful action, but could also involve a years-long process.

Facebook and the FTC have declined to comment, although Facebook has previously disputed allegations of being anti-competitive.

The long-in-the-works suit is expected to accuse Facebook of using acquisitions and control over data to squelch competition. It won’t necessarily force the company to offload Instagram or WhatsApp. Those are options, however, when officials have argued that much has changed since the FTC slapped Facebook with a

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California Uber drivers sue company over Prop 22 app notifications

It’s no secret Uber has been aggressively supporting Proposition 22, a California ballot initiative that would allow the company to skirt a state law requiring them to classify drivers as employees. 



a close up of a side view mirror of a car: An Uber logo is shown on a rideshare vehicle during a statewide day of action to demand that ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft follow California law and grant drivers "basic employee rights'', in Los Angeles, California, U.S., August 20, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake


An Uber logo is shown on a rideshare vehicle during a statewide day of action to demand that ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft follow California law and grant drivers “basic employee rights”, in Los Angeles, California, U.S., August 20, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake

Now, a group of the app’s drivers say the company’s lobbying has gone too far. The Washington Postreports that a group of drivers have sued the ride hailing company over its aggressive use of in-app pop-ups encouraging drivers to support Prop 22. The in-app notifications require drivers to click through the messages while they’re working. This amounts to “illegal political coercion,” the lawsuit claims.

Uber didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. But the company

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US Government To Sue Google For Antitrust Violations

Google is one of the biggest tech companies in the world, but it will soon face a stout legal challenge from the US government. The Justice Department has filed a 57-page complaint with the US District Court in Washington, D.C. that accuses Google of engaging in anticompetitive business practices in an attempt to protect a monopoly on internet searches.

“For many years,” a portion of the suit reads, “Google has used anticompetitive tactics to maintain and extend its monopolies in the markets for general search services, search advertising and general search text advertising — the cornerstones of its empire.”

The legal battle is expected to drag on for years, and it’s not yet clear what the potential fallout for Google would be if the company lost the suit. Alphabet, the parent company of Google, is valued at over $1 trillion. As noted by the New York Times, Google has fought

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Clarence Thomas Is Begging Someone to Sue Over Conservatives’ Most-Hated Internet Law

Even the most serious students of the law sometimes get the law wrong. That’s why I’m willing to cut some slack for Justice Clarence Thomas, who took the occasion this week to propose that some plaintiff, somewhere, should bring the right kind of Section 230 case to the Supreme Court. Thomas practically issued an engraved invitation for parties to bring a case that would enable the court to narrow the law that law professor Jeff Kosseff has rightly classified as containing “the 26 words that created the internet”: “No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider.”



Clarence Thomas in a suit and tie: Photo illustration by Slate. Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images.


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Photo illustration by Slate. Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images.

This language, a single sentence in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, establishes a baseline of protection for internet platforms from being

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