Teen who built popular coronavirus tracking website has COVID-19 and calls it ‘pretty terrible’



a person standing posing for the camera: Avi Schiffmann. (Instagram Photo via @avischiffmann)


© Provided by Geekwire
Avi Schiffmann. (Instagram Photo via @avischiffmann)

Avi Schiffmann, the Seattle-area teen who built a website to track the early and ongoing spread of coronavirus, has tested positive for COVID-19.

Schiffmann, 18, tweeted about his diagnosis on Monday evening and in an email to GeekWire said that he feels “quite bad.” He tested positive on Thursday and is quarantining at his family’s cabin along with his mother, a doctor who has also tested positive, according to Schiffmann.

“I had a bad headache and a sore throat, but it’s since progressed into a bad cough, shortness of breath (like it’s actually pretty hard to breath with a mask on) and somewhat feels like my lungs are on fire,” Schiffmann said. “Overall it’s pretty terrible. Hopefully it will give a message to other people my age who think we are all invincible. Because I really thought that, too.”

Loading...

Load

Read More

Mercer Island teen behind international COVID-19 data website tests positive for virus

Avi Schiffmann’s open-source website featuring COVID-19 case data was getting millions of hits from all over the world. He is now one of the statistics he reports.

MERCER ISLAND, Wash. — A Mercer Island High School student who became globally-known after creating a website to track coronavirus data is now suffering from the virus himself. 

Avi Schiffmann is now hoping his experience will send a message to his peers, who he said may not be taking the warnings seriously. 

Back In March, Schiffmann started getting worldwide attention, even if people didn’t know his actual name. 

At that time, he told KING 5, “I thought it was sort of cool to create a website that was a central hub of information,” when explaining why he created his website. 

His open-source website featuring COVID-19 case data was getting millions of hits from all over the world.

Today, he’s now one of the

Read More

Indian-American teen wins $25,000 for work on potential COVID-19 treatment

A 14-year-old Indian-American girl has won a USD 25,000 young scientist challenge for a discovery that could provide a potential treatment for COVID-19.

Anika Chebrolu, an eighth grader from Frisco in Texas, won the 3M Young Scientist Challenge, regarded as the US’ premier middle school science competition, for her work using in-silico methodology for drug discovery to find a molecule that can selectively bind to the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 virus in an attempt to find a cure for the coronavirus pandemic, according to the 3M Challenge website.

3M is an American manufacturing company based in Minnesota.

Advertisement


Chebrolu decided to take part in the Young Scientist Challenge after she battled a severe influenza infection last year. She wanted to find a cure for influenza. However, that all changed after the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the website said.

“I was drawn towards finding effective cures for influenza disease after a severe

Read More

A Modern-Day David and Goliath – Techno Teen Takes on Computer Giant – and Wins!

“Those who say it can’t be done need to get out of the way of those that are doing it.” Unknown

The entrepreneur of today’s world can be compared to the legendary Don Quixote – chasing windmills in search of great fortune.

The entrepreneurial journey I would like to share with you in this article might be a bit of a surprise. I find it remarkable yet I have barely seen it mentioned in the press over the years.

Imagine the following scenario. The year is 1983. You are a college freshman at The University of Texas in Austin, sitting in your dorm room playing around on your computer.

1983. Pre-Internet. Pre-computers-on-every-desk, in-every-room-of-the-house. These were the days of PONG, where very few people sat around playing with personal computers. (If you don’t know what PONG is, ask someone a lot older than you.)

Back to your dorm room. You are … Read More