Conservative censorship goes beyond Twitter and Facebook after WordPress deplatforms popular website

The conservative site the Conservative Treehouse claimed it was deplatformed by hosting provider WordPress.

“Most CTH readers are likely aware of the term ‘deplatforming.’ Unfortunately, the big tech control mechanism to shut down speech & assembly has now arrived on our doorstep,” a post on Conservative Treehouse reads.

The site said it received a message from WordPress reading, “Given the incompatibility between your site’s content and our terms, you need to find a new hosting provider and must migrate the site by Wednesday, December 2nd.”

The Conservative Treehouse describes itself as the “last refuge” for conservative readers, saying, “Whatever trail through the woods brought us here, we have shared the turmoil of storms as we have been finding our voices as individuals in this growing community.”

The reported deplatforming caught the attention of Rep. Devin Nunes, who posted on Parler, “IMPORTANT! Please share with all your friends. This is what’s

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Facebook, Twitter CEOs express support for changes to key law governing internet speech

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies virtually Tuesday about social media’s responsibilities in fighting hatred while promoting free speech.


Screenshot by CNET

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey agreed Tuesday to support changes to a key federal internet law even as they pushed back at allegations that their companies are biased against conservative views.

In a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, the pair of executives answered a range of questions that strayed from the original topic: how the companies handled the 2020 US election. The four-and-a-half-hour hearing touched on tech addiction, encryption and antitrust, in addition to content moderation.

The testimony marked the second congressional appearance for both men in less than a month. Though the exchanges were more cordial than last month’s, it was clear from the outset that lawmakers are intent on reining in the two popular social networks. One frequently raised possibility: revising Section 230, a

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Facebook, Twitter CEOs say they would support changes to key internet law

jack-dorsey-nov-17-2020-senate-hearing.png

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies virtually Tuesday about social media’s responsibilities in fighting hatred while promoting free speech.


Screenshot by CNET

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey agreed Tuesday to support changes to a key federal internet law even as they pushed against allegations their companies are biased against conservative views.

In a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, the pair of executives answered a range of questions that strayed from the original topic: how the companies handled the 2020 US election. The four-and-half-hour hearing touched on tech addiction, encryption and antitrust, in addition to content moderation. 

The testimony marked the second Congressional appearance for both men in less than a month. While the exchanges were more cordial than last month’s, it was clear from the outset that lawmakers are intent on reining in the two popular social networks. One frequently raised possibility: revising Section 230, a key federal

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to urge lawmakers to build on key internet law

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Facebook and Twitter took steps to crack down on election-related misinformation.


Angela Lang/CNET

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey plans to tell US lawmakers on Tuesday that Congress should build on a federal law that shields internet companies from liability for user-generated content rather than eliminate it.

In prepared remarks, Dorsey says lawmakers should work with “industry and civil society” to address concerns about the law, which is called Section 230. Some of the potential solutions, he says, include “additions to Section 230, industry-wide self-regulation best practices, or a new legislative framework.”

“Completely eliminating Section 230 or prescribing reactionary government speech mandates will neither address concerns nor align with the First Amendment,” Dorsey says in excerpts of prepared remarks provided by Twitter. “Indeed, such actions could have the opposite effect,

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Facebook & Twitter Return To Capitol Hill; Internet Rules Among Issues “Piling Up” For Media Regulators In Biden Era

Click here to read the full article.

With the White House set to shift parties in January, powerful regulatory agencies the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission face sweeping issues with big implications for tech and entertainment, from antitrust and privacy to net neutrality, legal immunity for Internet platforms and media-cross ownership.

“They are piling up. Many issues that we were working on a decade ago are still around — the digital divide, net neutrality, copyright — and now we have others, like looking at big tech antitrust and Section 230. We need to see policymakers step up and take action,” said Christopher Lewis, president and CEO of policy nonprofit Public Knowledge, which promotes free expression and an open Internet.

Curating Internet content, or not, is by far the noisiest issue and the most political. The right and left both have concerns about how social media platforms operate,

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On Twitter, Trump will soon have to follow the same rules as everyone else

Donald Trump and social media

James Martin/CNET

It seems it won’t be long before President Donald Trump will have to follow the same rules and regulations on Twitter as everybody else — or risk having his tweets removed.

With multiple news outlets calling the presidential race for Joe Biden on Saturday, it looks like Trump — aka the notoriously provocative tweeter @realDonaldTrump — will be leaving the Oval Office in January. And at that point, his tweets would no longer be subject to the “public interest” exceptions Twitter makes for government leaders.

The exceptions policy “applies to current world leaders and candidates for office, and not private citizens when they no longer hold these positions,” a Twitter spokesperson said in a statement Saturday.

The social network leaves up some posts by officials even

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Tweets Have Spoken: Twitter Search Links Trump to ‘Loser’ | Top News

(Reuters) – Twitter users searching for the word “loser” on Saturday were greeted with an unusual first result: U.S. President Donald Trump’s account.

The search result appeared as major news organizations declared that voters had delivered the presidency to Trump’s opponent, Democrat Joe Biden, after four days of nail-biting suspense following Tuesday’s election.

Searches for “winner” in the same “People” tab on Twitter, which suggests accounts to follow rather than turning up results from the text of users’ tweets, pointed to the accounts of Biden and his running mate, U.S. Senator Kamala Harris.

Twitter said the results were automatically generated based on how people on the app were using the terms in their tweets at the time.

“If an account is mentioned often alongside certain terms, they can become algorithmically surfaced together as an association. These associations are temporal and ever changing based on how people tweet,” the company said

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Facebook and Twitter struggle with online fury from Trump supporters

HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA - NOVEMBER 05: A child holds a sign as dozens of people calling for stopping the vote count in Pennsylvania due to alleged fraud against President Donald Trump gather on the steps of the State Capitol on November 5, 2020 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The activists, many with flags and signs for Trump, have made allegations that votes are being stolen from the president as the race in Pennsylvania continues to tighten in Joe Biden's favor.
Enlarge / HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA – NOVEMBER 05: A child holds a sign as dozens of people calling for stopping the vote count in Pennsylvania due to alleged fraud against President Donald Trump gather on the steps of the State Capitol on November 5, 2020 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The activists, many with flags and signs for Trump, have made allegations that votes are being stolen from the president as the race in Pennsylvania continues to tighten in Joe Biden’s favor.

Spencer Platt | Getty Images

Facebook and Twitter are struggling to contain rising anger from Donald Trump’s supporters online, as a wave of momentum builds around the US president’s claims that the election is being stolen from him.

In the past 24 hours, Facebook has invoked emergency measures to make it harder for users to share posts that contain misleading information, to remove such posts from people’s newsfeeds, and to restrict

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