Canon Officially Launches EOS Webcam Utility Software for MacOS and Windows

Hot on the heels of Nikon’s official webcam software release, Canon has announced its free full production version of the EOS Webcam Utility Software for both macOS and Windows, bringing with it compatibility for 43 EOS and PowerShot cameras and 14 video conferencing services.

Now officially out of beta, the software converts compatible Canon EOS interchangeable lens and PowerShot cameras into high-quality webcams for supported video conferencing services and streaming.

While Nikon’s software was brought out of Beta on November 4, 2020 and supports several popular interchangeable lens cameras and the most popular video conferencing services, it doesn’t include all of Nikon’s most recent cameras and none of its CoolPix line of point and shoots. The software is also limited in its compatibility with all the video conferencing services available.

Canon has gone above and beyond in this regard, bringing support to more cameras and more conferencing services than Nikon

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90% of Chicago voters say the internet should be a public utility



a person sitting at a desk with a computer on a table: A man fills out a ballot at a booth inside an internet cafe, behind a row of computers.


© Provided by Quartz
A man fills out a ballot at a booth inside an internet cafe, behind a row of computers.

Chicago voters faced a simple question on their 2020 ballots: “Should the City of Chicago act to ensure that all the City’s community areas have access to broadband internet?” By a nine-to-one margin, they answered “yes.”

The result is significant for what it says about public attitudes toward the internet. In the context of a broader debate about whether we should treat the internet like a public utility, Chicago voters signaled that the most basic formulation of this idea—that the government should make sure citizens have internet access—is overwhelmingly popular.

Support for universal internet access isn’t confined to left-leaning metropolises like Chicago. In the most rural parts of the US, communities are investing steeply in building their own broadband networks explicitly designed to cover every one of their

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Why The Internet Should Be a Public Utility

The System Reboot logo

Illustration: Jim Cooke

The internet is here, it’s just not evenly distributed. While some people have access to high-speed fiber-optic cable running to their house or phones ready to connect to 5G, there are also swaths of broadband deserts where people can’t access internet at reliable speeds.

Decades of disinvestment have left communities in what are essentially Sahara, Gobi, and Mojave deserts of internet access where rickety old DSL and other hookups bring unreliable and slow internet to the masses. At least 21 million in the U.S. don’t have access to high-speed internet. Under normal circumstances, that’s a problem, but during a pandemic where everything from schooling to doctor’s appointments are conducted online, it’s a nightmare.

Illustration for article titled Why the Internet Should Be a Public Utility

The free market has done little to close this huge gap—and is in fact the reason it exists in the first place. Absent ISPs suddenly growing a heart or seeing beyond

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The pandemic makes clear it’s time to treat the internet as a utility

After months of being stuck at home, many Americans know full well that there are three things they can’t live without. Two of them are power and water.



a screen shot of a computer keyboard: Like power and water, the internet has been shown by the pandemic to be a necessity for households. It's time for it to be regulated as a utility. (Los Angeles Times)


© (Los Angeles Times)
Like power and water, the internet has been shown by the pandemic to be a necessity for households. It’s time for it to be regulated as a utility. (Los Angeles Times)

The third, I’m sure, will be obvious to all.

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Internet access.

Imagine this prolonged ordeal without being able to work or attend school from home, without email, without being able to shop online, without streaming video and music.

The few times my home has lost power and/or internet access since the pandemic began (including just this week), it felt like life came to a crashing halt. The harsh reality of isolation became impossible to ignore.

“We’re looking at something that has truly become a necessity

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