Trump’s Maricopa County vote challenge not about fraud, attorney says

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Claims that “potentially thousands” of Arizona voters were disenfranchised dissolved during a six-hour court hearing on Thursday, as a lawyer representing the president’s reelection team dialed back allegations of “systematic, improper” vote overrides. 

Donald Trump’s campaign, along with the Republican National Committee and the Arizona Republican Party, had filed a lawsuit on Saturday alleging Maricopa County poll workers routinely disregarded procedures designed to give voters a chance to correct ballot mistakes on Election Day.

But within minutes of the start of proceedings on Thursday morning, attorney Kory Langhofer insisted the plaintiffs were “not alleging fraud” or “that anyone is stealing the election” — simply raising concerns about a “limited number of cases” involving “good faith errors.”

That was perhaps a prescient shift, given that testimony from several witnesses failed to bear out anything more. And before Langhofer even made his opening

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Fact-check: Michigan software ‘glitch’ didn’t affect vote totals

Republicans claimed a ‘glitch’ on software used across Michigan gave Biden additional votes, but the state said it was human error that did not affect totals.

In Michigan, an error in the unofficial election results reported in one county led to allegations that votes were misallocated to Democratic candidate Joe Biden instead to President Trump.   

In a press conference on Nov. 6, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel echoed these claims. 

“There was a major software issue in Antrim County that we have concerns could have had problems in other counties as well,” she said. 

THE QUESTION

Did a “major software issue” cause the statewide election results to be affected in Michigan? 

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No, Software Glitches Are Not Affecting Vote Counts

President Trump and many of his supporters complained over the weekend that “software glitches” undermined the vote counts in Michigan and Georgia and argued that the problems portended wider issues in other counties and states that used the same software.

But issues in the unofficial vote counts in Michigan’s Antrim and Oakland counties were caused by human error, not software glitches, according to reviews by the Michigan Department of State, county clerks and election security experts. Officials concluded that they were isolated cases that did not signal wider issues with vote counts elsewhere.

And in Georgia, software issues only affected how poll workers checked-in voters in two counties and delayed the reporting of results in another. The issues did not affect the counts.

“Anyone trying to falsely connect the situations in the two states is spreading misinformation in an effort to undermine the integrity of our elections system,” said Tracy

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Failure updating software caused Antrim County vote glitch

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Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson talks about Michigan election

Detroit Free Press

LANSING — A failure to properly update software was the reason for a computer glitch that caused massive errors in unofficial election results reported from Antrim county, the Michigan Department of State said late Friday.

And a U-M professor of computer science and engineering who specializes in voting systems and securities says it appears the snafu arose from an “unusual sequence of events very unlikely to affect any other jurisdictions.”

“The erroneous reporting of unofficial results from Antrim county was a result of accidental error on the part of the Antrim County clerk,” the state agency that oversees elections said in a news release.

There was no problem with the voting machines or vote totals, which were preserved on tapes printed from the tabulators, the state said. The problem occurred when the totals by precinct were

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Failure to update software caused Antrim vote glitch

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Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson talks about Michigan election

Detroit Free Press

LANSING A failure to update software was the reason for a computer glitch that caused massive errors in unofficial election results reported from Antrim county, the Michigan Department of State said late Friday.

“The erroneous reporting of unofficial results from Antrim county was a result of accidental error on the part of the Antrim County clerk,” the state agency that oversees elections said in a news release.

There was no problem with the voting machines or vote totals, which were preserved on tapes printed from the tabulators, the state said. The problem occurred when the totals by precinct were combined into candidate county-wide totals for transfer to the state, using election management system software, the state agency said in a news release.

“All ballots were properly tabulated. However, the clerk accidentally did not update the software

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Antrim Co. vote count problem was ballot change, not software

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — As Republicans raise alarms about the software used in Antrim County, where votes ultimately had to be counted by hand, the West Michigan-based company that makes the software says the problem was human error.

In early returns, it initially looked like Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden had garnered more votes in Antrim County than Republican President Donald Trump. In a county that has long been a Republican stronghold, it was almost immediately apparent that something was wrong. The votes were recounted Wednesday and it was determined Trump did win in the county.

It turns out the mistake was an isolated incident linked to human error.

Kentwood-based ElectionSource, which created the election management software used in Antrim County, said in a Friday afternoon

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Facebook, Alarmed by Discord Over Vote Count, Is Said to Be Taking Action

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook is planning to enact new measures to make it more difficult for election misinformation to spread virally across its platform, two people with knowledge of the matter said Thursday, as the outcome of presidential race remains uncertain.

Facebook plans to add more “friction” — such as an additional click or two — before people can share posts and other content, said the people, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly. The company will also demote content on the News Feed if it contains election-related misinformation, making it less visible, the people said.

The measures, which could be rolled out as soon as Thursday, are a response to heightened strife and social discord on Facebook, these people said. They said there had been more activity by users and Facebook groups to coordinate potentially violent actions over election issues such as voter fraud. President

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California Proposition 22: live vote count, results

  • Polls have closed in California on Proposition 22, which would allow companies to hire app-based drivers as independent contractors instead of employees of the company.
  • A recent study from the University of California, Santa Cruz shows that over 70% of gig workers work more than 30 hours a week but do not receive most employee benefits.
  • Insider will have live results on the propositions as soon as they come in.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

California’s 2020 ballot includes Prop 22, which would allow app-based drivers and delivery workers to work as independent contractors instead of company employees. State law currently requires rideshare and delivery companies to hire drivers as employees, not independent contractors.

A recent study from the University of California, Santa Cruz shows that over 70% of gig workers work more than 30 hours a week but do not receive most employee benefits. If Prop 22

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Latam FX to edge up initially if Democrats sweep U.S. vote

By Gabriel Burin



a stack of flyers on a table: FILE PHOTO: Mexican peso banknotes are pictured at a currency exchange shop in Ciudad Juarez


© Reuters/JOSE LUIS GONZALEZ
FILE PHOTO: Mexican peso banknotes are pictured at a currency exchange shop in Ciudad Juarez

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) – Latin American currencies are poised to edge up briefly against a weaker U.S. dollar with a potential Democrat sweep in the U.S. elections, but domestic challenges will continue holding them back after any initial bounce, a Reuters survey showed.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden’s lead over Republican U.S. President Donald Trump has widened in the final days of the 2020 campaign in three critical Rust Belt states that Trump narrowly won four years ago, according to Reuters/Ipsos opinion polls.

The Mexican peso and the Brazilian real are set to gain in the event of a solid Democrat victory that would open a path to a swift fiscal stimulus package and gains for sectors such as green energy, adding downward pressure on the

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Future of gig workers could hinge on California ballot vote

Gig companies have long argued that people who drive for Uber or deliver food for DoorDash aren’t employees but rather are self-employed — a vital legal distinction that allows many internet “platforms” to withhold benefits and take other steps to minimize their labor costs. Now, Californians will weigh in on that question by voting on a ballot measure dubbed Proposition 22.

Prop 22 aims to create a permanent “independent contractor” status for platform workers. Critics say the ballot measure allows app companies to underpay and exploit workers. The app companies maintain that without it, they may be forced to raise prices or cut back their services. Here are the issues at stake in the most expensive ballot measure in California’s history.

A giant loophole

An estimated 500,000 people in California work for gig companies, including DoorDash, Instacart, Lyft and Uber. These players classify their workers as independent contractors — essentially

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